World
11.5.16

Rebekah Brooks to Return as CEO for Rupert Murdoch

Photo by Mitchell Hall. From Flickr.

Rupert Murdoch, chairman of News Corporation, has appointed Rebekah Brooks, former CEO and editor, to return as chief executive at his company. In 2011, she resigned from the business because of the phone-hacking scandal, however she was cleared of any wrongdoing last year by a jury. She was given a pay off of around £16 million by News Corporation who were said to be extremely sad to see her leave. Mrs Brooks will take over from Mike Darcey, who was appointed chief executive just after Mrs Brooks’ resignation in 2012.

One of her new responsibilities will be to see the development of the digital transitional period at News UK over the next few years. As we all know, the publishing industry has had to make some very big changes in the last ten to fifteen years. The rapid development of technology has allowed society to be given much greater options as to how people can consume information, allowing everyone to have a voice and express opinions before on different subjects through social media. In recent months, Mrs Brooks has been seen spending a lot of time at the London offices where the Sun and the Times are based. Many felt it was therefore just a matter of time, being one of Mr Murdoch’s closest confidantes, until she was appointed again as CEO at News Corporation.

Mrs Brooks started in journalism at a very early age – about fifteen. She then joined the News of the World at twenty, working her way up the ladder and becoming editor in 2000. In that period, she was the youngest editor of a leading newspaper; the first time that a woman had done so well in the publishing industry. In 2003, she began working at the Sun newspaper and did equally well there. Her friends describe her as clever, captivating and persuasive towards others. She built close ties and friendships with politicians from all the different parties in the UK, including the prime minister, David Cameron. This caused great debate as to associations between members of the media and politicians whilst the allegations were being directed at Mrs Brooks in 2010-2011.

Will past events and her high-profile court case hinder Mrs Brooks at News Corporation and lead to a quiet lack of respect amongst her new colleagues when she starts her latest position? However one looks at it, she was a key figure in the company at the time and should have made sure that such unlawful practices were not taking place whilst she was in charge. At the least, she was extremely naive – hopefully lessons have been learnt. Though she has been cleared of all charges, only time will tell whether mud truly sticks.

Global Seven News

Lee Cross